Buying Guides

Which head unit suits with my car Single DIN and Double DIN?

 

There are two main radio sizes, “single DIN” and “double DIN,” and it’s actually pretty easy to figure out which one you need. If your car has a single DIN head unit, the front faceplate should be about 7” x 2” (180 x 50 mm.)

 If it has a double DIN head unit, the front face plate will be twice as tall. Since “2 DIN car stereo” is a colloquial term for double DIN, the head unit in your car will measure roughly 7 x 4 in. (180 x 100mm.) if it conforms to that standard.

If your car came with a double DIN head unit, you have the choice of replacing it with a single or a double DIN car stereo. If it came with a single DIN head unit, then you have to replace it with another single DIN head unit.

 

 

Is 2 DIN better than 1 DIN?

 

If you’re concerned about replacing a 2 DIN head unit with a single DIN car stereo for quality reasons, you can stop worrying! Double DIN head units aren’t necessarily better than single

DIN head units. Although there is more space for internal components (like built-in amplifiers).

The main benefit of double DIN head units is typically in the display, since double DIN comes with so much more screen real estate than single DIN. Most of the best touch screen head units fit the double DIN form factor, which also means that most of the best video head units also fall into this category. However, there are a number of great single DIN head units that have flip-out touch screens, so choosing one from factor over the other really comes down to personal preference.

 

 

Plug and play

 

All of our stereos are ‘plug and play’, meaning, you do not need to cut any cable to install it. It doesn’t require any adapters for your speakers, power, radio antenna or your steering wheel controls.

http://cartech.about.com/od/Car-Audio/fl/What-is-a-2-DIN-Car-Stereo.ht

 

 

Our Quality

 

Dig options guarantee their products are of the highest quality in the market and fortunately for you, at a very reasonable and competitive price. Comparing our products and price with some of the big brand names in the market and you’ll identify that our products are very similar but at a lower price!

Our manufacturer is based in China with a strong reputation in the market for being up to date on new models as well as building reliable and high performance stereos.

We delivery our product from Melbourne

 

 

Why change my car stereo?

 

Replacing the factory installed entertainment system allows you to customize the system to get the best performance. Purchasing a new system allows you to select the best Head Unit, amplifiers, speakers, subwoofers and accessories and build a first-class mobile entertainment system. Dig Options offers many options to build a new in-dash stereo system for your vehicle according to your requirements.

 

Features

  • Enables a better performance
  • You can add features not available in factory installed systems, such as cameras, subwoofers, Tire Pressure Monitor Sensors (TPMS) and parking sensors
  • In addition to these features, all Dig Options systems have Bluetooth, GPS (Global positioning system and a Plug for your Ipod as well as the ability to watch movies and videos in your ca
  • Most of the time this integration allowable through the synchronisation  of their phones via Bluetooth

How Can I Upgrade My Stereo?

 

Whether you want to wake up your neighbourhood with pounding bass, or just plug your iPod into a dedicated stereo input, the thought of upgrading the sound system in your vehicle has probably crossed your mind at some point.

 

Everything Starts with the Head Unit.

The single most important component in any car stereo system is the head unit. This is the component that some people call a stereo, but it can also be referred to as a tuner, receiver, or deck. Most head units do contain AM and FM tuners, but they can also include CD, DVD, MP3 players, inputs for iPods, Bluetooth connectivity, and much more.

If you’re wondering about the best place to start upgrading your car stereo system, the head unit is usually going to be the answer you’re looking for. Each component in a car stereo system is somewhat dependent on the others, but the head unit is where it all starts.

Since most factory head units are light on for features, plugging in an aftermarket unit can really improve your overall driving experience.

When choosing a head unit, you should look for all the features you expect to need within the next few years. You might want to consider installing a head unit that’s a little more powerful than you actually need. In that case, you’ll be able to upgrade your stereo system in the future without the added expense of buying another head unit. 

 

Speakers and Amplifiers

 

The other main components of a car stereo system are the speakers. Not all factory sound systems ship with a separate amp, but they do all come with at least four speakers. While you can upgrade them without installing a new head unit, you’ll probably be disappointed with the sound quality. Unless your vehicle came with a premium head unit, it probably won’t be able to properly take advantage of upgraded speakers.

 

On the other hand, installing better speakers can provide you with more room to upgrade the other components in the future. Even if your current head unit can’t take full advantage of the situation, you’ll have the option to put in a better head unit or an amplifier in the future.

 

On the other end of the audio spectrum, you can get a lot of mileage out of upgrading or installing a subwoofer. Most vehicles don’t come with subwoofers, but the ones that do are usually pretty anemic. If your car or truck didn’t come with a subwoofer already installed, the easiest option is to look for a unit that includes a built-in subwoofer. 

 

What is a Bluetooth

 

Bluetooth is an open wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances

(using short length radio waves) from fixed and mobile devices, creating personal area networks with high levels of security. Today Bluetooth is managed by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group. Using Bluetooth to contact and transfer information is the main phenomenon as seen in car driving and mobile phone. Without any wire or phone bracket, the driver can also control the phone nearby via voice instruction while driving. To use this function, you need to match the mobile phone with the car audio first. Once there is a call, you can answer via the audio easily, only by pressing one key or by voice. Use the dial keyboard while you need to give a call. It is safe and convenient especially when you drive on the road.

 

 

Reasons why you have a Bluetooth in your Dash Stereo

For many reasons, Bluetooth is merely a safer way to make calls while driving, but there are many more reasons to wirelessly connect your phone with your car.

Bluetooth has already established itself as the de facto wireless connectivity standard for phones, cars, and a plethora of accessories. However, many users view Bluetooth as just the thing that lets you make calls in your car, the blinking blue light that lets you know the guy talking to himself on the sidewalk isn't crazy, yet another thing to distract you, or (for a surprising number of users) something to be completely ignored. So, I've presented below some reasons why Bluetooth in the car merits a second look.

 

1. Telephony (HFP)

The Hands-Free Profile (HFP) that enables speakerphone calling is the part of Bluetooth that most of you are already familiar with. After a brief pairing process, your car stereo's speakers and a microphone hidden somewhere in the cabin take over the output and input of audio during calls while driving. Almost all hands-free systems include some sort of caller ID system, but the best take advantage of HFP's sister profile, the Phone Book Access Profile (PBAP), to sync with the contacts stored on your phone to display (and sometimes speak) the names of callers, browse an address book of known contacts, and gain access to logs of recently missed, received, and dialed calls.

 

2. Audio streaming (A2DP)

The same wireless connection that was used to carry voice data for the hands-free call can now be used to listen to music stored on your phone, stream from an Internet radio service such as Pandora or Spotify, or listen to podcasts or audiobooks.

 

3. Text messaging (MAP)

The Message Access Profile (MAP) gives a Bluetooth-connected receiver -- in this case, your car -- bidirectional access to SMS messages on your phone. Incoming messages can be read aloud while you drive, relieving the temptation to reach for your phone every time the notification sounds for fear of missing an important message.

 

4. Data tethering and apps

Many Bluetooth-enabled phones are capable of what is called data tethering, which allows the handset to share its Internet connection with a connected device. While this is good in a pinch for answering e-mails with a laptop, the connection is really too slow for image-heavy Web browsing. 5. Universal support.

You'll be hard-pressed to find a phone on the market that doesn't support Bluetooth connectivity for HFP, A2DP, and MAP. That goes for Apple, Android, smartphones feature phones, the newest uberphone and your dad's flip phone. Likewise, nearly every car on the market offers Bluetooth connectivity as either a standard feature or an inexpensive option.

Our devices are designed to provide all the options above in your car, if you’re interested in some of them, just visit us in this link or send us an email and please attached the following information:

- Make

 

-Model

 

-Year

 

-Series

 

-Vehicle Colour

 

We will find the right Device for your car or any accessories that you are looking for

 

 

Rear view Cameras

Our reverse cameras use two technologies CCD and CMOS, both provide a good view of the objects but CCD camera gives you a better resolution due to the technology employed.

A CCD camera or Charge Coupled Device is a sensor that converts light into electronic signals.

A very high quality images is the result of the low noise level, high fill factor, and good signal-to-noise ratio exhibited by CCD sensors. These characteristics make cameras based on CCD sensors a good fit for cameras vision applications.

 

This means:

Our CCD cameras produce a better image quality and sharper picture.

What are the Benefits of CCD and CMOS cameras?

 

The quality of both cameras are very good but you can find some difference between them:

  • CCD camera is more sensitive to light
  • From CCD camera you can have a clearer image during day and night, this means more detail in the image
  • CMOS camera is cheaper than CCD becoming more affordable for the customers  The power consumed by CMOS is less than CCD camera.

 

 

Why do you need a Monitor?

 

With the rise in popularity of in-dash DVD players & GPS navigation systems you might already have a perfectly suitable colour LCD monitor onto which the images from your reversing camera(s) can easily be displayed. Even if your unit is not built into the dash and is held in place with a suction cap, it can do the same job. Keep in mind that the larger the monitor, the easier it will be to see any obstructions.

Whilst your reversing camera system really only needs the camera that you attach to the rear of the vehicle/trailer & the monitor for viewing there is of course a bit more to it than that. Here's a run-down on features and options and tips for putting the ideal system together to meet all your rear view and reversing needs.

 

 

Why use rear view Cameras for caravans and Trucks

 

You might think that's too obvious, but let's look at this question some more. Are you looking for a reversing camera on a caravan or camper trailer? If so, what about a camera over your tow-ball to help hitch it up. Do you want to run the camera only when reversing, or would you like the advantage of keeping the camera on when you're driving forward?

Many travellers find that their rear-vision mirrors become useless as the view is blocked, either by the front of a caravan, or a full load in the wagon, so putting a camera on the trailer can be a more practical solution than adding wide external caravan rear vision mirrors.

 

Parking Sensors

 

If you wonder whether you need a parking sensor or not, the answer is yes, in order to have a safe drive.

 This device can allow you to park safely in every small place without having to worry about the circumstances. The system is designed in order to alert you of various parked cars and other objects. It can also detect the presence of low walls and children.

The Parking Sensor can help you detect every object that is out of your vision. These sensors are supplied as a sort of kit that can be installed in no time. This kit is easy to use and install and you will be provided with a wide range of options. You can choose every setting according to your own requirements. You are the only person who knows what is best for your car and driving experience. The main benefit of this device consists in the fact that it will be activated as soon as you start parking your car. When your car will be engaged in reverse gear, the Parking Sensor will be activated. It is like having an extra pair of eyes right on your back. Every potential collision can thus be avoided; this is the main reason why you should rush into buying some parking detectors for your car.

There are other benefits too. For instance, you will need no extra holes in your car in order to install the Parking Sensor.

 

Tyre Pressure Monitoring

 

A tyre pressure system is a safety device that measures, identifies and warns the driver when one or more tyres is significantly under-inflated. Each sensor transmits temperature, air pressure, battery state and sensor location to the vehicle’s computer.

Some of the newest vehicles on the road today use tyre pressure monitoring systems to make sure that all four tyres are properly inflated. This can be a very valuable feature in a car or truck for several reasons.

 

  • Road safety.

Under-inflated tyres can be dangerous. They can cause strange, erratic drive patterns at high speeds. A tyre pressure monitoring system keeps an eye on tyre inflation continually, for maximum safety in everyday driving situations.

 

  • Increased MPG.

Proper tyre inflation also leads to maximum miles per gallon for a vehicle. Driving with under-inflated tyres can burn a lot more gasoline on any given trip. Good tyre pressure maintenance will lead to cost savings and lower fuel consumption.

 

  • No more manual tyre pressure readings.

Before tyre pressure monitoring systems, drivers had to always monitor their tyre pressure with manual gauges. That meant kneeling down to each tyre, taking off the valve stem cap, and inserting the tyre pressure gauge. With new tech tyre pressure monitoring systems, this is no longer necessary.

 

  • Increased vehicle value.

A tyre pressure monitoring system can add value to the vehicle, as a feature that saves on costs.

  • Better insurance rates.

Because a tyre pressure monitoring system helps with safety, it may lead to lower insurance premiums for your vehicle.

 

Benefits

- Peace of mind knowing that your tyres, your only contact with the road, are inflated

properly for optimum performance and handling.

- Monitor displays current tyre pressures for all tyres.

- Tyre pressure is constantly monitored, while moving or parked.

- Dig Options TPMS alerts to dangerous low-pressure situations with both a visual and an

audible alert.

- Two thresholds of low tyre pressure warnings - a double threshold of safety.

- Greater stability, handling and braking with tyres properly inflated (Tyres with low air

pressures skid and hydroplane more easily).

- Each year 80,000 accidents are attributed to low tyre pressure.

 

INTERNAL vs. EXTERNAL TYRE PRESSURE MONITORING SYSTEMS

There are two types of Direct Tyre Pressure Monitoring Systems internal sensor systems where the sensor is inside the tyre or external systems which use external sensors. Internal systems use sensors that are strapped around the wheel or replace the valve stem and are inside the tyre. Internal sensor systems require additional antennas in the wheel wells for reliable reception of sensor signals, are expensive to install and maintain and are challenged with getting a reliable signal through the metal and materials of a tyre. External systems are those which have sensors which read from outside of the tyre.

 

ROI - Savings Calculated On Information From Tyre Industry & Government Statistics:

 

Trucks driving an average of 150,000 miles per year, averaging 7.5mpg, fuel costs averaging 3.75/gallon – a savings of just ½% amounts to over $375 per year in fuel usage.

 Tyres low on pressure break down the casing which can’t be retreaded. New tyre costs range between $250 to $650 per tyre for a new tyre (vs) retreads at $100.

 Road call costs are averaging $300 to $900 per call. (This does not include cost of downtime, tyre repair or driver time.)

 Cost of manually checking tyre pressures on one (1) truck with 10 wheels, average of 15 min (DOT) twice per month for 1 year will average about $75 to $100 in labor cost.

Tyres running just 10% low on pressure prematurely wear tyre tread 10% to 13% faster than tyres properly inflated.

 Safety “costs”; injury claims, insurance premiums, workers' compensation claims, as well as "goodwill" with customers and suppliers are difficult to estimate but are a very real cost affecting profits.

 

WHY INTERNAL SENSORS?

WHY EXTERNAL SENSORS?

 

Sensor installed inside the tyre where the air pressure and temperature are intended to be checked. This is the only way to guarantee the accuracy of the data.

 

Less expensive, quick and easy to install.

 

Internal Sensors are installed inside wheel

assembly. Good for all wheels

The Function of External Sensor are the

same as the internal.

 

It will not be stolen, will not be knocked off,

will last for the whole product life (5-7

years)

Installation is quicker than internal Sensors

 

Does not affect tyre valve stems.

 

 

Easy to inflate the tyre.

 

 

 

 

ROI - Savings Calculated On Information From Tyre Industry & Government Statistics:

 

  • Trucks driving an average of 150,000 miles per year, averaging 7.5mpg, fuel costs averaging 3.75/gallon – a savings of just ½% amounts to over $375 per year in fuel usage.

 

  • Tyres low on pressure break down the casing which can’t be retreaded. New tyre costs range between $250 to $650 per tyre for a new tyre (vs) retreads at $100.

 

  • Road call costs are averaging $300 to $900 per call. (This does not include cost of downtime, tyre repair or driver time.)

 

  • Cost of manually checking tyre pressures on one (1) truck with 10 wheels, average of 15 min (DOT) twice per month for 1 year will average about $75 to $100 in labor cost.

 

  • Tyres running just 10% low on pressure prematurely wear tyre tread 10% to 13% faster than tyres properly inflated.

 

  • Safety “costs”; injury claims, insurance premiums, workers' compensation claims, as well as "goodwill" with customers and suppliers are difficult to estimate but are a very real cost affecting profits.

 

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